The challenge of explaining what you do

I had an awkward moment with a close friend recently. I’ve known Harsha for more than a decade and she’s someone I’ve leaned on every now and then for marketing advice around the various programs I offer. The awkward moment arose because, after five years of telling Harsha about the Digital Champions Club, she still had to ask me what it was exactly that I do.

At the time I found it quite disheartening, that someone who is clearly switched on, someone who genuinely cares about me and what I do, someone who I’ve spent hours talking to about my work still didn’t have any real clarity about what the Digital Champions Club is or why it exists.

My initial response was a sense of frustration — initially directed outwards at Harsha’s failure to listen, and then directed inwards at my own inability to clearly articulate my proposition. So why is it that we struggle to convey things clearly?

I think firstly it’s because it’s hard to get out of our own heads. What I mean by this is it’s hard to explain things without the context of a whole bunch of other stuff that may also need explaining but that you aren’t aware enough to realise. As a result, the explanations which sound whole and well rounded to us are hollow and incomplete to others.

Second, I think the packaging can get in the way of the product. Our desire to create things that are unique, memorable and exciting brings us to use language that is unnecessarily complex and difficult to follow. Unless it’s meant to be a genuine surprise, perhaps it’s best that we dispense with some of the gift wrapping.

Thirdly, and perhaps most importantly, I feel like a bit of a dick talking about myself. Which means I generally don’t do it, and therefore when I do it’s all a little off the cuff and just kind of sounds a bit awkward, which in turn makes me feel like a bit of a dick…and the cycle continues.

So Harsha set me a challenge: articulate the Digital Champions Club in a way that people could actually understand and then share it with all the other people who, like her, are currently unsure of what it is I do.

I’ve been procrastinating on this for a couple of weeks because, apart from the dislike of talking about myself, it feels a little awkward to be openly broadcasting my inherent uncertainty and lack of clarity in a world where ‘experts’ are meant to have endless reserves of both.

Yet perhaps in a small way this is a form of therapy, so Harsha, after hours of struggle and refinement here it goes….

I support small and medium-sized organisations who are struggling to build momentum in the delivery of their technology projects (sometimes referred to as digital transformation). I do this through a combination of monthly coaching (to provide support and accountability), one day workshops (for deep learning) and peer-to-peer sharing (to reduce risk). Collectively, these are delivered as a technology-focused, continuous improvement program called the Digital Champions Club.

So how did I do? No, honestly, I’d genuinely like to know…and it really does still sound hollow and incomplete (or even if it doesn’t) feel free to download it my latest white paper “When Technology Fails to Deliver” which explains a whole bunch of the other stuff that goes around in my head.

P.S. I’ve already been back into LinkedIn to edit this…twice.

Should we be doing nothing?

Atlassian describes itself as a do-ocracy. Google spends huge amounts of time and money working on projects with no clear commercial application.

The way forward_600x400

Why is it that the most successful tech start ups spend so much time doing new things (often without clear direction) rather than perfecting the old things that they are already doing?

Let’s take a moment to compare three things we could do, nothing, one thing andlots of things

Doing nothing is really a commitment to doing the same things that you’re already doing. Doing the same things is a great approach when

you’re 100% sure of the thing you need to do…

….and you’re already doing it

If you’re not already doing the thing you need to be doing, then doing that one thing would be better than doing nothing.

But neither of these are good approaches if you don’t know what you need to be doing. If you’re not 100% sure of what you need to do, then doing nothing is not a great approach and the false sense of security that comes with doing one thing is potentially worse.

What successful technology companies realise is that the direction is clear, even if the destination is not.

There is no progress made by doing nothing

A much better approach is to do some things, lots of things. Not all of these will be the right things but some of them just might.


  1. What the hell is a do-ocracy?
  2. A book on doing something (actually 50 things)
  3. Google X: How doing the wrong thing is often the right thing

News from the Digital Champions Club

Normally I’m not one for much self promotion but I’ve mentioned the Digital Champions Club a few times recently and want to give you a peek behind the curtain so you can see what’s being going down.

Curious? Read on!

Damn it, I have some other pressing spam messages to delete but what the heck

We held our first Digital Champions Club Boot camp for seven enterprising digital champions at the beginning of March. The event included the extraordinary Mykel Dixon hosting a conversation about culture and purpose, the enigmatic Paul Gaudion discussing digital projects at John Holland and the wonderful Kate Fuelling helping mentor and support members. Thankfully, we also had Dave Dixon there to capture the event on film and he’s pulled together a short video which brilliantly captures the intent of the Digital Champions Club…in under 1 minute. Take a look.

And everything now looks shinier

Whilst this has all being going on behind closed doors we have also been working on changing things out the front. To make it easier for SMEs to connect the dots between their people, work and technology, we’ve just launched a new website (you can check it out at digitalchampionsclub.com) and added some great new events…and the first of these is completely free.

Yes, some things are free…

Every few weeks I will be hosting a virtual conversation with small business owners on how to identify the next generation of digital opportunities for their organisation.

You can find out more by visiting the website and clicking on ‘Join in the Conversation’. Each virtual conversation is limited to just 20 participants to give space for interaction and questions so it would be wise to book early to get your preferred date and time.

…but others are not

Apart from the free virtual conversations, I will be hosting a series of breakfasts at the end of May for organisations who want to take the next step in identifying and developing their digital champions. The ‘Breakfast of Champions’ will be held in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane and will cost $79 for a double ticket including breakfast and a copy of my new book The Digital Champion: Connecting the dots between people, work and technology.

We will have the dates finalised shortly, but if you are interested please email me so you are at the top of the list once the events are launched.

Did you say a new book?

Yes I did. Almost a year to the day after publishing Analogosaurus: Avoiding Extinction in a World of Digital Business I am just finishing the final draft of The Digital Champion: Connecting the dots between people, work and technology. In a way the first book was a book for the managers and executives who needed a gentle shove towards embracing a digital future, the second one is a practical guide that shows organisations how to do it.

If you would like to make a small contribution to the book, you could help by giving your feedback on the cover design. I’m currently running a design contest on 99 Designs and you can have your say here.

The crowd’s not that wise…but there is still a lot you can learn

The other day I was talking to a potential member of the Digital Champions Club. He loved the concept but was concerned that his organisations (which worked in software development) might not get a lot of value out of his membership. One of the really cool aspects of the Digital Champions Club is a quarterly peer learning bootcamp where member organisations get together and share information about the digital projects they are working on. Given that he worked for a software development company that was already fairly tech savvy, he wasn’t sure there was a lot he could learn from other organisations in the program.

Crowd

In one sense he was perfectly correct. His organisation would have been right near the top when it came to technology use and if he was to engage one on one with any other member of the program he would probably have more to give than to get out of the conversation. But if he was to compare his organisation to the collective knowledge of ALL the members of the program then it would be a quite different story.

The idea that the collective can determine a better outcome than the individual dates back to 1907 when Charles Darwin’s cousin Francis Galton discovered  that the average of all entries in a ‘guess the weight of an ox’ competition (yes really) was more accurate than any individual guess. We explicitly rely on this concept for a whole bunch of things such as determining the price of shares on the stock market, and determining the odds when you bet on a sporting contest.

Except it turns out that the crowd is not that wise. Firstly we know that stock markets fluctuate and the underdog in sporting contests sometimes wins. In fact recent research has shown that unless very specific conditions are met, such as having a large, diverse and unbiased crowd then their predictions are not that great. Given that the number of organisations participating in the Digital Champions Club is relatively small and not really that diverse* this seems to undermine the value proposition that the program offers. After all, if the crowd isn’t really that wise, wouldn’t you just be better off going it alone?

Just because the crowd isn’t that wise doesn’t mean there isn’t still a lot to learn. The difference between the Digital Champions Club and say the stock market is that we are not using the crowd to predict the future. We are just using the crowd to test it. By having a whole bunch of different organisations identifying, investigating and implementing digital projects and then sharing what they have learnt with the group, the whole group is going to learn faster.

I consistently hear that one of the biggest challenges for small and medium sized businesses (and even big ones) is getting good advice on which digital tools to test and deploy. Ultimately, being a part of the Digital Champions Club allows organisations to tap into the collective knowledge of the crowd, rather than the wisdom of it.

*They come from a variety of industries but are mostly small and medium sized businesses
There are still a handful of places left in the first intake of the Digital Champions Club. If you or your organisations want to find out how to tap into the collective knowledge of the Club please get in touch.

When the drought turned to flood

I read an article recently that said that following the Afghanistan war, the US Army completely changed their information sharing policies. It turns out that the Army had important information that could have saved lives and assisted their own troops but the ‘need to know’ approach to information management meant that the right information didn’t get to the right people fast enough. The new approach is to share information on a ‘need not to know’ basis. Rather than ‘is there anything I should tell you?’ It is now, ‘Is there anything that I should hold back?’

armed-forces-600x400

Over the last couple of decades, we have moved from a world of information drought to a world of information flood. When you are in drought, you hoard the things that are scarce and the ownership of this resource is a source of power.  The problem is the same hoarding mentality doesn’t serve you well in an information flood. Hoarding information just means you are more likely to drown in it.

[tweetthis url=”http://bit.ly/1PRgA0X”]In an information flood, value is created by diverting the resource to where it is most needed.[/tweetthis]

In an information flood, value is created by diverting the resource to where it is most needed. In the US Army’s case, this was the troops on the ground. Think about which of your mindsets and approaches to information management are based in a scarcity or drought mindset rather and an abundance or flood mindset. Are they still serving you or is it time to update your tools and techniques to a world of information overload?

Will you be your Champion’s champion?

What to do about digital disruption

As a speaker for The Executive Connection I have spoken to over 400 SME executives about the impact of digital technology on business over the last two years. Almost without fail, these CEOs have acknowledged the pressing need to take a more proactive approach to digital technology and identify opportunities to disrupt their own business (before someone else does). Yet for all the urgency around digital disruption, theirs has generally been a large amount of inaction and the biggest frustration for many of these CEOs has been in knowing what to do next.

SW_HiRes_600x400

The reason for this is that the ‘what to do next’ is different for each organisation. Every one of the CEOs I spoke to was dealing with a unique organisational problem based on available skills and experience, legacy systems,  and industry requirements that shaped their opportunities and defined their needs. As such any cookie cutter solution imposed from the outside would be unlikely to have any meaningful long term impact. As a result, one of my great frustrations has been in knowing how to support these organisations in a way that was both effective and cost effective.*

What is missing is a Digital Champion

What I now realise is that these organisations don’t need someone from the outside telling them what to do. They need someone on the inside making things happen. They need an internal resource that was tasked with helping the organisation identify, prioritise, and implement against digital opportunities as they occur This is the role of a Digital Champion.

In larger organisations, the Digital Champion might otherwise be called the Chief Digital Officer. According to McKinsey, the number of CDOs in the world is growing at 200% per year (with Melbourne City Council being the latest organisation to add one) and this extraordinary growth is a direct reflection of the growing need for organisations to take a proactive rather than ad-hoc approach to digital technology. In smaller organisations, budgetary and resourcing constraints mean a full time CDO is unrealistic. Instead SMEs need a Digital Champion that can provide a similar set of skills on a part time basis.

Given the extraordinary (and growing demand) for digital skills, there is little chance that SMEs will be able to hire the Digital Champion they need. Instead, they are going to have to develop them.** Although there is a good chance that a potential Digital Champion already has a passion for technology, they will need help and support to channel this passion into relevant (and valuable) business projects. They will need help identifying and prioritising opportunities, leading and influencing others, and implementing the projects that matter.

Welcome to the Digital Champion’s Club

The Digital Champion’s Club is my answer to what SMEs need to do next in an age of digital disruption. In essence, it is a support group for Digital Champions, giving them all the resources they need to identify and launch successful digital projects. A member of the Digital Champions Club will get

  • A tailored development plan and development goals
  • Expert one on one mentoring on a monthly basis
  • Lightning email/phone support as required
  • Access to a resource library of templates, models and other useful stuff

Best of all, they will get to participate in the quarterly Club Days with their peers. Club Days will provide a unique learning experience where a group of between ten to 20 Digital Champions from different organisations get together. During the day there will be a combination of expert tuition, peer learning sessions, and the opportunity to work on their digital project in a supportive environment.

Through this model it is expected that Digital Champions (working on a part time basis) should deliver between $100,000 and $500,000 in benefit to their organisation per year.

Will you be your Champion’s Champion?

Through the Club I see my role as being the champion of Digital Champion’s, but this is not something I can do alone. I can provide external support and the ‘push’ to help your Digital Champion develop but they will also need an internal champion to provide the ‘pull’, someone who can provide the resourcing, internal support, and influence to help them deliver the projects that disrupt your business for the better. The question is, will you also champion your Champion?

Applications are now open for the Digital Champions Club. If you see the opportunity in developing a digital champion and think this might be your ‘what to do next’ about digital disruption, I would love to talk to you – champion to champion.

 

*Coming from a small business background I am incredibly conscious of the challenges that these organisations face, especially when it comes to ensuring that limited financial resources are channeled into the types of projects that have a high return on investment and a good chance of success.

**It is unlikely that this is a role that you will recruit for, primarily because the person you need would be either unavailable or prohibitively expensive. Instead, your digital champion is probably someone already in your employ. It is likely to be the person that you or your other staff turn to when you’re looking for advice about new technology.

Is your leadership team drinking from the firehose?

The time we seem to spend managing information rather than doing our work always amazes me. Research by Google a couple of years ago suggested that information workers (people who do thinking work, rather than doing work) spend over 30% of their time looking for stuff…and not always successfully.

fire-hose

The hashtag #TMI is used on social media to refer to someone who shares just a little too much about their personal lives. #TMI stands for Too Much Information and the truth is, this is not just a problem in our personal lives, it is just as much a problem in our professional lives as well. People cc us in on conversations we don’t really care about, and we sit through meetings to get the smallest of status updates that are actually relevant to our roles and we scan endless documents to try and find the bit that’s important.

We are trying to drink from a firehose and all we are doing is getting wet.

It used to be that being at the centre of communication channels in an organisation was a benefit. Now it is just a burden. We have more and more information to get through and our main strategy to date has been to just spend more and more time doing it. The truth is, every hour managing our information is an hour that we don’t spend doing what matters.

I’m not suggesting that we don’t check our email (as appealing as that sounds). What I am suggesting is that we can do it better. What if we could use a combination of technique and technology to improve the way we manage our information. A program I recently ran for the leadership team of one of Victoria’s local councils is a great case study of this. It showed that giving people the right techniques and the right technology to manage their information (and then showing them how to use it) reduced the time burden of #TMI by more than 2 hours a week per participant with one director citing a saving of 5 hours per week. Across the whole leadership team the total time saving was about 90 hours per week, or the equivalent of two full time employees.

But this is not just about time saving (if you have read some of my previous blogs you would know that this is an incredibly poor measure of productivity), this is really about freeing up your leadership team to focus on what really matters. Apart from the time saving the training also gave the leadership team the tools they needed to collaborate better, to work with greater flexibility and to make more informed decisions.

To stretch the analogy just a little too far, we need to teach our leaders how to get cup full of water when they need a drink and save the firehose for when we need to fight fires.

If you live in a world of too much information and can’t afford to keep throwing more time at the problem, get in touch to find out more about the leadership programs I run.

Do you think your orgnisation could manage it’s information better?

Why digital will change the way boards operate

In life we are used to dealing with trade-offs: work back late or spend time with the family, buy a new car or pay down the mortgage, go to the gym or sleep in for an extra hour. And when it comes to trade offs, we have been led to believe that it always involves an opportunity cost. But is that entirely true?

1966-Toyota-Corolla

Perhaps the most classic example of trade-offs in business is the Project Management Triangle. The triangle depicts the three preferred outcomes of a project: Time, Cost, and Features. And the saying goes that you can pick two out of three. If you want a project on time and low cost, then you will get less features. If you want more features and it delivered on time, be prepared to pay for it.

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But the one thing this model doesn’t account for is changes in technology. Take for example the car production line. Improvements in technology mean that we now get a higher quality car, with more features, for the same cost. The original Toyota Corolla cost 360,000 Yen when it was launched in 1966 – about 1.5 times the average monthly salary. And for that you got little more than a box with an engine and four wheels attached. The current cheapest Corolla is the Yaris (both longer and wider than the original Corolla) which costs about 2x the average salary in Australia. By comparison, it comes standard with rear reversing camera, air conditioning, touch screen audio, and voice controls.

So we are getting much better cars for the same price as we paid 50 years ago. So according to the Project Management triangle, the rate of production must have slowed to a crawl, yet labour productivity at Toyota has doubled over the same time period.

So what is the difference between the way Toyota operates in 2015 vs 1966?

Technology

What if we were to apply this same approach to our work as organisational leaders and decision makers? What if we could make better decisions in less time and with lower cost? What if, just like Toyota, we could reduce the waste out of our work and spend more time on the things that matter.

[tweetthis url=”http://bit.ly/1h4n1yX”]To have a world class board, we must have a commitment to technology and continuous improvement.[/tweetthis]

Digital technology is providing this opportunity, yet the take up of digital tools by key decision makers has been slow (and slower in Australia than in most parts of the world) and scarily, the higher you in the organisation, the worse it gets with Board members generally showing a lower understanding and being less supportive of digital technology than their CEOs.

Toyota became the number one car company in the world because of a commitment to technology and a focus on continuous improvement. It goes without saying that if we want to operate as a world class boards or world class executive teams we need to start taking a similar approach.

Image credit: “Toyota Corolla First-generation 001” by D.Bellwood

Digital Conversations with Patrick Hollingworth

It is my pleasure to present this week’s Digital Conversation with Patrick Hollingworth, an accomplished high-altitude mountaineer and leadership, teamwork, and business safety expert. In his professional role as a business consultant, Patrick draws from his mountaineering experience to help individuals and organisations cope with uncertainty in a changing business environment.

Patrick provides a unique perspective on why organisational leaders need to to be employing emerging technologies, especially mobile, cloud and social, to drive agility and flexibility in the way people work.


Patrick-Hollingworth

 

S: You talk a lot in your work about the idea of VUCA, could you explain what this means and why it’s important for businesses?

A: VUCA is an acronym which stands for Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity. It originated in the United States Military and was devised as a succinct way of describing the ‘new’ landscape that the US military found itself in after the cessation of the Cold War. The global landscape had seemingly changed overnight from bilateral (i.e. the West vs. the Soviet Union) to multilateral (i.e. the West vs. many smaller, unknown opponents). This altered landscape would, they predicted, bring with it a lack of stability, certainty and simplicity, and an increase in ambiguity. For the most part, they were spot on.

Since then it’s been picked up by a few people who consult to organisations, me being one of them. I reckon it’s a great way of summarising the new landscape which, not only organizations, but all people and society are dealing with today. Globalisation and social and political change is having a significant impact on pretty much every aspect of our lives and most of this change is driven by technological disruption. I think a lot of us tend to dismiss it as a concept which only applies to Silicon Valley and the tech sector. But nothing could be further from the truth. Everything is ripe for disruption and the problem with disruption is that it’s really hard to predict or forecast where it will happen next. Essentially, you can’t, so VUCA describes the landscape we’re all in and it requires us to develop new ways of doing things. What worked yesterday is barely working today and certainly won’t work tomorrow!

S: What is it about your own experience that has led you to focus on this particular subject area?

A: It’s a kind of interesting path that led me to focusing on the work that I do around VUCA today. At university, I studied an interesting mix of geography, anthropology and psychology, and that led me to working as a consultant to a lot of large mining and oil and gas companies during Australia’s mining boom of the 2000’s. I worked for a small but very successful niche consulting company which, at the height of the boom, was acquired by a large multi-national consultancy. Overnight, they attempted to transplant their large organisational culture into this small niche company. It failed miserably and I got to see first-hand how badly cultural change programs can go. Within a few years of the takeover, more than 80% of the original staff had left.

At the same time, I was developing my skill set as a mountaineer and was embarking annually on Himalayan climbing expeditions. That eventually led me to climbing Everest in 2010, and subsequent to that actually working as an expedition leader, so I spent a lot of time in that Himalayan environment at high altitude. In my experience, there’s no better place for testing out what individuals and teams are capable of than when put under pressure at high-altitude. Everything is really hard up there!

As I continued my consulting work with large organizations, I started to notice that the business and political landscape post GFC was becoming increasingly uncertain, and that many of these organisations were responding to this uncertainty in a fairly reactive manner. It occurred to me that that is the last thing you would do in the mountains when surrounded by uncertainty. That’s how accidents happen. So that’s when I started looking at the similarities between the high-altitude mountain environment and this new business landscape, where uncertainty and overwhelm are the norm. And it just so happened there was already a word for it – VUCA!

S: What are some of the successful strategies you would put in place in a VUCA mountaineering environment and how do they translate to the corporate world?

A: Before setting in place a specific strategy, I would actually start with establishing an overarching context, a philosophy under which everything else will sit. This central philosophy is essentially an acceptance that the forthcoming period (be it a day, week, month, however long your climb or expedition is going to take) is going to entail some discomfort. Possibly even a bit of suffering. But I need to prepare myself for that in a mental context firstly. Then once I’m in the mountains, and something violent happens, such as an avalanche, or if uncertainty persists, such as fast moving or unpredictable weather, I’m not caught off-guard.

With regard to an actual strategy, I use a framework which consists of nine elements. The first three are about choosing the approach, building the team, and making sense of the surrounding environment. The next three steps are about the getting the vision, team engagement, and resilience right. Then the final three are about making safe decisions en route, constant learning, and thinking longer-term.

I find that all of this is of huge relevance to the corporate world, but in recognising this relevance, you need to move beyond the approach of the typical motivational speaker who might proclaim that “I climbed Mount Everest and you can too.” Today’s corporate world is way more complex, informed, and nuanced for such a simple message. However, when you go a whole lot deeper, that’s when you can start extracting some really powerful learnings.

S: I appreciate your expertise is not in technology but as you pointed to technology earlier as a key driver of the uncertainty that many businesses are facing. If you were to apply your framework to an organisation’s technology decisions, what advice would give them?

A: I reckon if applying my framework to an organisation’s technology decisions, probably the most important factor would be the first: getting the approach right.

In mountaineering, there are generally two schools of approach. The first one is called Expedition Style, and that’s where you lay siege to the mountain and overpower it with excess manpower and equipment. It’s a really effective way of getting climbers to the top, and it’s used on about 99% of occasions in the Himalayas due to the extremely high altitude. The downside to it, however, is that it’s a fairly cumbersome approach. Whilst it’s powerful, it’s also a bit unwieldy and slow to respond. It’s not a particularly agile way to climb. The second approach is known as Alpine Style. That’s where you climb in a much smaller team carrying far less equipment, which allows you to move really quickly. It’s an arguably more exposed way of climbing, but it does mean that you’re agile and can respond really quickly to the changing environment. You’ll be up on the summit and back down in base camp before any of the expedition style climbers have even had breakfast!

Applying this analogy to technology within an organisation, I guess it’s like mainframe computing versus cloud computing. Mainframes are the expedition style of computing: large and powerful and pretty expensive to operate, and really well suited to large organisations dominating a stable and known environment. Cloud and mobile computing, on the other hand, are like alpine style: they’re much cheaper and affordable for smaller businesses, and enable agility and flexibility that allow organisations to more quickly adapt to a changing and uncertain business environment.

Patrick is a TEDx presenter, a trained workshop designer and presenter, and an accredited practitioner of the Hermman Brain Dominance Instrument (HBDI), an internationally renowned and highly effective diagnostic tool for determining the cognitive thinking styles of teams and individuals. To learn more about what he can do for you and your team, visit patrickhollingworth.com.

If in doubt, follow the pirate with the peg leg

In my final post on what we can learn about leadership from pirates it is time to get down to action, or more specifically actions.

During the 1600s there was a famous French pirate by the name François Le Clerc. He was famous for two reasons, firstly he was incredibly successful, holding down position 13 in Forbes list of Top Earning Pirates of all time (yes there really is a compiled list of top earning pirates), and secondly he had a peg-leg. bhc0315

Legend has it that Le Clerc, or “Jambe de Bois” (“Peg Leg”) was a lead from the front type of pirate and was often the first to board the enemies ships. Eventually though this was his undoing and in one such raid he lost his leg (but in return scored a great nickname). Undeterred, Peg Leg then entered the most successful period of his career, leading a fleet of ten vessels and over 300 men he sacked the capital of Cuba, Raided Puerto Rico and plundering treasure from Grand Canary Island.

[tweetthis url=”http://bit.ly/1HwdOsz”]Leading by example is not a one-off thing. It must be done time and again to show true commitment.[/tweetthis]

So, why were so many other pirates willing to follow him into battle, even after he had lost his leg? Because he led by example, and he didn’t just do it once, he did it over and over again.

When it comes to technology we often expect others to go where we aren’t willing to go ourselves. We think it is all well and good to have a digital transformation strategy as long as we don’t have to change. Ultimately we need to lead by example. We need to demonstrate with our own actions, and ultimately, some self sacrifice that we are willing to change and learn new skills just as we are asking others in our organisations to do.

And it is not good enough to just do it once. An action is an anomaly, it is actions that show true commitment.

If you would like to read the other blog posts in this series you can find them here: What is your digital vision, Have an approach where x marks the spot, and Speak from the main deck.